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Write - Share - Read - Respond

Discussion: Ideas on OpenLit v0.3

A WIKI page has been created for this topic, please go there. The WIKI page has public edit active. Otherwise, please read on and post comments below, thanks!

Part 1 Basics about OpenLit

What is OpenLit?

"All writers are readers, and many readers are writers. By enabling community sharing and responding, Oort-Cloud catalyzes interactivity and engagement between writers and readers. This is how readers become better readers, and how writers become better writers."–Paul B. Hartzog of www.oort-cloud.org

I'm trying to expand a definition a little more, any ideas?

What is the OpenLit history?

On September 2, 2006, Paul B. Hartzog wrote an article entitled Social Publishing for the Corante Many-to-Many blog. From that article, the idea for www.oort-cloud.org was born, and presumably, the idea of OpenLit evolved from the practical application of Social Publishing. (please expand)

How is OpenLit structured?

Write - Share - Read - Respond

  • Write-First, writers write.
  • Share-Second, writers share with others what they have written.
  • Read-Third, readers read what is available.
  • Respond-Fourth, readers respond to what they have read.

–Paul B. Hartzog, Richard Adler of www.oort-cloud.org

How does copy-law fit into OpenLit?

Considering the OpenLit collaborative interpretation, the copy licensing of choice would be a CreativeCommons , Copyleft , and/or PublicDomain designation, although a CopyRight is not prohibited. A breakdown of CreativeCommons licenses, CopyLeft ShareAlike, PublicDomain, and CopyRight is coming soon.

Why use an OpenLit structure?

With the increasing dissemination of information, and the increasing amount of online users, it has become apparent the benefits of collaborative processes when dealing with content. Content could be anything from music, video, knowledge, news, art, writing, research, data archival, etc. Idealistically, any possible topic or interest could be formed into a collaborative structure for content generation. So in the spirit of a great social experiment, we at Oort-cloud are attempting to apply the idea of group collaboration with science fiction writing.

Why use Science Fiction?

Historically, the Science Fiction genre is known as being cutting edge. Science Fiction is an artistic writing style that theorizes what may be (has been, is, add other time/dimension tense here) possible and presents it in a form that is accessible to anyone. Additionally, SF is deeply rooted in the technology and science subculture, so it stands to reason that SF is imbued with many characteristics of modern, real world theory and innovation. Therefore, I think it is appropriate that SF should be the crucible for this experiment.

Part 2 Ideas on OpenLit Theory

OpenLit Cycles

I tend to think of OpenLit ideally working in a cyclical form. Meaning that feedback loops are created amongst readers, writers, editors, and publishers. Now, I believe different types of feedback loops could be created, some of which I will discuss below.

  • Provider/Subscriber Serial (PSS)-this is the type of SF commonly seen on oort-cloud.org currently. Provider posts content to the main blog, then subscribers read it, and makes comments. The provider observes and interacts with subscribers via comments, and makes adjustments to the content accordingly.
  • Multi-Provider/Subscriber Serial (MPS)-this type of cycle involves a group of providers working in collaboration on content. Theoretically, the number of providers could be very large, but the question of practicality arises. An example:
    • Joe creates a story; he denotes it with a tag like: MPS. Mark reads Joes work, likes it, and responds, saying he would like to contribute content. Joe establishes a number of content providers he would like to include in his MPS cycle. In this case, let’s say 2. Joe and Mark take turns writing the story,while observing comments from subscribers. Thus the story is ping-ponged between the two, with each making their own contributions.
  • Subscriber Serial-this type of cycle is truly an open cycle. The initial provider posts a general plot, then it is open for subscriber to add and remove their ideas. Ideally there would be some Digg, Slashdot, or Reddit style ranking system for the most popular ideas to rise to the top of the list. This cycle is ideal for large amounts of people. The initial provider would be responsible for the actual writing of the story.

Provider-Subscriber Types

In theory, every member of an OpenLit community belongs to a specific group(s) or subgroup(s).
Obviously there could be combinations of these types, as well as other types I haven’t thought of. Examples could include:

  • Copy Provider- a content provider who only posts content under copyright and observes/uses subscriber comments
  • Open Provider- a content provider who posts content under CopyLeft/CC and observes/uses subscriber comments
  • Provider/Subscriber- a user who provides content and posts comments as a subscriber to other provider’s works.
  • Editor- a user who has skills in English who is trying to use editorial skills.
  • Subscriber- a user who reads and comments on other peoples works
  • Soft Subscriber- a user who reads other works, does not take an participatory role in community. (thanks Lenny Zero)
  • Publisher- a user who has experience in the publishing industry.

Part 3 Possible OpenLit Social Software

The OpenLit concept has direct applications for software. Examples:

- A comment ranking system. This would be used to rank plot comments in a subscriber serial, thus moving the popular plot changes the “masses” want to see to the fore front, while moving the less popular ones away. Examples: DIGG, REDITT, etc.

- A WYSIWYG editor with specific application for multi-provider editing.Features could include:

  • a comment organizer to keep track of comments and the ability to arrange them in certain ways (date,most replies, most starred - if comments were rated) this would be useful as a way to have all subscriber input in one place during a re-write, as opposed to many different nodes/locations.
  • multiple user function. Say you and I wanted to do a serial together. We would have a place were we could upload work between us, make edits in real time, and discuss direction without having to use a public blog or email platform. Theoretically you could do this with multiple (>2) people, although I imagine that could get confusing. However, a system could be arranged for a massive multi-provider serial...which would be really cool if it worked correctly.

Come on oort-cloud, lets see what ya' got! -thanks

paulbhartzog's picture

Open what?

Glad to see people are interested in talking about this. I'll post a few thoughts in a blog post....

It's never too early to get "meta"

alphaborie,

It's nice to see people excited about the structure as well as the contents- that's one of the
qualities that attracted me to Oort in the first place.

So far, the comment system has been very beneficial. Ideally, everyone would fall under one
of your catagories in the community- but if I'm not mistaken, most visitors to the site are
"soft" subscribers- they read, but don't comment.

So, I suppose the best future would be what would make the soft subscriber happiest.

My background, by the way, is journalism and film. So, for the less technically minded,
what would a WYSIWYG editor look like? Are there any examples that I could see? Just
curious.

every wall collapses, given enough time.

WYSIWYG editor

I think a WYSIWYG editor would be awesome as well. Especially since I use a lot of (excessive?!!) italics. Dead Channel uses FCKeditor (http://www.fckeditor.net/),which works very well. There is some occasional screwiness when you paste from Word and such, but for the most part, it's pretty slick.

I think it would lower the barriers to entry for people who aren't willing to go through and add HTML tags. Whether that's a good thing or not, I leave to the Cloud's creators...

Lets see

I agree about the soft subscriber as you put it (good terminology). Perhaps enabling comments for them as well? That might encourage them to get more involved, or just speak there mind.

A standard What You See Is What You Get editor has several functions. They way I understand them is: The text I enter onto the screen is what is posted. Bold, italics, margins, formatting, etc is the same, no having to use HTML code.

The WYSIWYG editor I was thinking of would be a little more advanced. It might have additional functionality like:

1.a comment organizer to keep track of comments and the ability to arrange them in certain ways (date,most replies, most starred - if comments were rated) this would be useful as a way to have all subscriber input in one place during a re-write, as opposed to many different nodes/locations.

2.multiple user function. Say you and I wanted to do a serial together. We would have a place were we could upload work between us, make edits in real time, and discuss direction without having to use a public blog or email platform. Theoretically you could do this with multiple (>2) people, although I imagine that could get confusing. However, a system could be arranged for a massive multi-provider serial...which would be really cool if it worked correctly.

There are collaborative writing sites out there, i haven't used any, but I believe they are primarily geared towards business and research. I'll find out what some of my friends use...

Thanks for posting the comment, you helped me clarify some stuff in my head about an editor. I added the soft subscriber definition and the additional WYSIWYG ideas. When I locate some examples I'll post the URLS. If you've got anything you want to add to the Discussion:Ideas on OpenLit please let me know.thanks -alpha

kelson.philo's picture

wiki me this...

That sounds like the rumblings of an Oort-wiki...which could be fun. Possibly intensive on the host's part. It's hard to beat a wiki's strength for collaboration, though.

Something I would like to see is an email notification when someone has left a comment on an entry or replied to one of your own comments. Don't get me wrong, I love digging through everything to see if i need to respond to something, it gives me a chance to see new things, but sometimes a little note can be extremely helpful in the organization department.

On the WIKI

I would like to move this to WIKI, but I have limited experience in setting up WIKI pages. I'd assume if one were to be created, we would use a standalone wiki interface page as opposed to a Wikipedia entry? feedback appreciated...

kelson.philo's picture

there are some hosts that

there are some hosts that offer wiki spaces free of charge, that aren't of the wikipedia vein.

one example: Wikispaces

pretty easy to set up and use and link to. might be a nice testing ground for collab werk.

i set one up right quick just to see if i could: kp

AAAAAHHH

Thats a big eye...Yeah wikispaces looks pretty cool, Im going to migrate Ideas on OpenLit when I get a chance. Thanks for the heads up. Migrated! website is: www.openlit.wikispaces.com.

kelson.philo's picture

nfity thrifty

hahaha...yah. it's almost lifesize! at least on my screen anyway.

the openlit spot looks good. if i can think of anything worthwhile to add, i will. don't forget the discussion tab! sometimes it's what's under the scene that proves to be most interesting...

somewhere in the back of my mind is a discussion brewing about what to do with your open lit after it's fully realized...

not my openlit

its everybody's openlit, and whats on the wiki is not necessarily "right". Just ideas....and throw those discussions up, if you get a chance...thanks!

paulbhartzog's picture

Email notifications

Email notifications are something we are looking into.

When I have an RSS feed that I really need to get notified about, I just add it into http://feedblitz.com/ and have it do the emailing for me.

:-)

kelson.philo's picture

feedblitz and AJAX look like

feedblitz and AJAX look like kewlio thingees. I will have to give them some attention!

Word..

The way I handle the comment thing is to click on my name under who's online, then click the track tab which gives an list of stuff I've visited, with new comments put on it. Additionally you could use an rss feed to an AJAX-type page such as netvibes to show comments to specific nodes, I haven't done this tho, I have way to many feeds on my homepage already! I do think an email notification for comments would be a cool feature. Im going to edit it that idea in soon with a couple others i've had...-thanks!